esSJae's Virtualization Blog

Virtualization and other IT topics

Windows 10 Hyper-V: Accessing ISOs from a Network Share

Posted by essjae on May 13, 2015


Keeping ISOs on a server/network share is a great way to save space for all your installation ISOs.  Unfortunately, Hyper-V does things a little different (it’s called constrained delegation) and can’t directly access an ISO file on a network share or mapped drive with your user account.  Hyper-V will ignore any mapped drives you’ve got, but with Windows 10 you can add a network location from Windows Explorer’s Computer tab (1). This makes it easy to get to a remote network share quickly.

You’ve got 2 options:

  1. Go to the ISO location and mount it as a physical drive. This tricks Hyper-V into thinking the disk is local and not network shared.  It works great for everything but Gen2.
  2. Constrained delegation configuration
    1. On a domain: this is easy, you just need to add your Hyper-V computer’s domain joined account to the network share.
      1. Go to the shared drive/folder and right-click–>Properties.
      2. Click the Sharing tab, click Advanced Sharing.
      3. Click Permissions, click Add.
      4. Click Object Types and select Computers, click OK.
      5. Enter the computer’s name, and click Check names, click OK to add.
    2. Workgroup/Microsoft accounts: this is a little more involved and care should be taken if this is used anywhere other than a home or lab network as you’re changing some security settings
      1. Go to Administrative Tools–>Local Security Policy, in Security Settings–>Local Policies–>Security Options change these settings:
        • Network Access: Do not allow anonymous enumeration of SAM accounts and shares – Change to: Disabled
        • Network Access: Let Everyone permissions apply to anonymous users – Change to: Enabled
        • Network Access: Restrict anonymous access to Named Pipes and Shares – Change to: Disabled
        • Network Access: Shares that can be accessed anonymously, add the name of the share on the Windows server, i.e. if the share name is “ISOs” add “ISOs” here. *I don’t have a non-Windows NAS, if you do and have found a solution for this, please let me know and I’ll post it

 

Footnote (1)

Notes:

  • Add a network share:
    1. Open This PC via the start menu, or Win+E.
    2. Click Computer, click Add a network location
    3. add-network-location
    4. Follow the Add Network Location Wizard to finish
      1. For a standard Windows share, use the syntax: \\servername\sharename replacing with the actual name of the server and share.

**Content created and tested on Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview Build 10074

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