esSJae's Virtualization Blog

Virtualization and other IT topics

Archive for the ‘Windows 10’ Category

VMGuest.iso for older Windows OSes in Win10/2016

Posted by essjae on March 2, 2017

If you’re playing around with older OSes in the latest versions of Hyper-V, you’re missing one thing, the Integration Components (IC).

With Win10/Server2016 they no longer include this ISO as the current “supported” OSes all get their IC viaWindows Update.

You can get the IC from Hyper-V 2012/2012R2 Server, a free download, here:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/evalcenter/evaluate-hyper-v-server-2012-r2 (you’ll need to either find a way to extract it or install Hyper-V Server in a VM to get the vmguest.iso)

Or, if you’ve got a Windows 8/8.1/2012/2012R2 VM/system available with Hyper-V installed you’ll find it in the C:\windows\system32\ folder.

I’ve got a copy from Hyper-V 2012 R2 here: https://1drv.ms/u/s!AnbqFQxI6C6pidtRrLfIRLDSHKeYmw

No guarantees how long MS will allow it will stay up here, though it’s freely distributed with Hyper-V Server.

Posted in Hyper-V, Virtualization, W2012, Windows 10, Windows 2012, Windows 2012 r2, Windows 2016, Windows 8, Windows 8.1 | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

VMware Workstation 12.5 now available

Posted by essjae on September 14, 2016

What’s New

  • Support for Windows 10 Anniversary Update
  • Support for Windows Server 2016

Also included are bug fixes, security updates, and performance improvements.

Full Release Notes here: http://www.vmware.com/products/workstation.html

Download: http://www.vmware.com/products/workstation.html

 

Posted in Uncategorized, Virtualization, VMWare, Windows 10, Windows 2016, Windows 2016 | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Adding NAT to Hyper-V in Windows 10 and higher

Posted by essjae on March 10, 2016

I found about this new way to create a NAT virtual switch in Hyper-V, it’s a lot less work than my previously documented method here: https://smudj.wordpress.com/2015/05/14/windows-10-hyper-v-setting-up-networking-shared-and-bridged-options/

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh848455.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396

New-VMSwitch

Creates a new virtual switch on one or more virtual machine hosts.

Syntax

Copy
Parameter Set: NetAdapterName
New-VMSwitch [-Name] <String> -NetAdapterName <String[]> [-AllowManagementOS <Boolean> ] [-CimSession <Microsoft.Management.Infrastructure.CimSession[]> ] [-ComputerName <String[]> ] [-Credential <System.Management.Automation.PSCredential[]> ] [-EnableEmbeddedTeaming <Nullable [System.Boolean]> ] [-EnableIov <Boolean]> ] [-EnablePacketDirect <Nullable [System.Boolean]> ] [-MinimumBandwidthMode <VMSwitchBandwidthMode> {Default | Weight | Absolute | None} ] [-NATSubnetAddress <System.String> ] [-Notes <String> ] [-Confirm] [-WhatIf] [ <CommonParameters>]

Parameter Set: NetAdapterInterfaceDescription
New-VMSwitch [-Name] <String> -NetAdapterInterfaceDescription <String[]> [-AllowManagementOS <Boolean> ] [-CimSession <Microsoft.Management.Infrastructure.CimSession[]> ] [-ComputerName <String[]> ] [-Credential <System.Management.Automation.PSCredential[]> ] [-EnableEmbeddedTeaming <Nullable [System.Boolean]> ] [-EnableIov <Boolean]> ] [-EnablePacketDirect <Nullable [System.Boolean]> ] [-MinimumBandwidthMode <VMSwitchBandwidthMode> {Default | Weight | Absolute | None} ] [-NATSubnetAddress <System.String> ] [-Notes <String> ] [-Confirm] [-WhatIf] [ <CommonParameters>]

Parameter Set: SwitchType
New-VMSwitch [-Name] <String> -SwitchType <VMSwitchType> {Private | Internal | External} [-CimSession <Microsoft.Management.Infrastructure.CimSession[]> ] [-ComputerName <String[]> ] [-Credential <System.Management.Automation.PSCredential[]> ] [-EnableEmbeddedTeaming <Nullable [System.Boolean]> ] [-EnableIov <Boolean]> ] [-EnablePacketDirect <Nullable [System.Boolean]> ] [-MinimumBandwidthMode <VMSwitchBandwidthMode> {Default | Weight | Absolute | None} ] [-NATSubnetAddress <System.String> ] [-Notes <String> ] [-Confirm] [-WhatIf] [ <CommonParameters>]

Example

New-VMSwitch -SwitchName "Virtual Switch" -SwitchType NAT -NATSubnetAddress "172.16.0.0/12"

Posted in Hyper-V, Uncategorized, Windows 10 | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Running DNS, DHCP, ADUC, etc, MMC Admin consoles with Windows 10 Microsoft Account

Posted by essjae on March 7, 2016

Note: This assumes you’ve already got the RSAT tools installed.  RSAT for Windows 10

Building on my post here for Hyper-V manager:

https://smudj.wordpress.com/2016/02/10/running-hyper-v-manager-as-a-different-user-in-windows-10-runas/

You can use the same method to get Active Directory Users and Computers (ADUC) and DNS MMC admin consoles working if you’re logged in with your Microsoft account versus your domain account:

admin-tools

DNS shortcut:

C:\Windows\System32\runas.exe /savecred /user:domain\username  "cmd /c Start /B %SystemRoot%\system32\mmc.exe %SystemRoot%\system32\dnsmgmt.msc""

Icon path:

%SystemRoot%\system32\dnsmgr.dll

ADUC shortcut:

C:\Windows\System32\runas.exe /savecred /user:domain\username  "cmd /c Start /B %SystemRoot%\system32\dsa.msc""

Icon path:

%SystemRoot%\system32\dsadmin.dll

When you double-click, you’ll get prompted for the password (if you haven’t already) and also for UAC

uac

dns

DHCP is a little more involved as the RSAT doesn’t include the DHCP manager.  NOTE: this is not currently supported by MS

  1. 1. copy dhcpmgmt.msc and dhcpsnap.dll.mui from %windir%\system32\system32\en-us on the 2012 server to the same location on the w10 pc
  2. copy dhcpsnap.dll from %windir%\system32\ on the 2012 server to the w10 pc
  3. From an admin cmd prompt run: regsvr32.exe dhcpsnap.dll
  4. Create the short-cut: C:\Windows\System32\runas.exe /savecred /user:domain\username  “cmd /c Start /B %SystemRoot%\system32\mmc.exe %SystemRoot%\system32\dhcpmgmt.msc””
  5. Change Icon path: %SystemRoot%\System32\dhcpsnap.dll

You’ll need to manually add your DHCP server each time you run this.  I haven’t found a way to save the config.

*This was done with Windows 10 Build 1511 and Windows Server 2012.

For additional snap-ins, just modify the last part of the short-cut with the correct mmc path for the add-in you want.

Posted in Sysadmin, Windows, Windows 10, Windows 2012 | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Running Hyper-V Manager as a different user in Windows 10 (Runas)

Posted by essjae on February 10, 2016

I hit a small issue while working on building up a test SCCM/SCVMM lab in Hyper-V.

My primary system (call it One) has Windows 10 and is domain joined, but I’ve been doing the “Microsoft” thing and logging in with my “Microsoft” account instead of my local domain account.

I’ve got two Hyper-V hosts, one on Windows Server 2012 R2 and another running on Windows 10* (call it Two).  I’ve been able to launch my Hyper-V Manager on One and connect and manage the Hyper-V VMs on Server 2012.

However, I hit a roadblock trying to connect to Two.  The first thing I tried after failing and getting some error messages was to configure winrm.

On Two:

I opened an administrator PowerShell window and ran

winrm quickconfig

and followed the wizard and was able to start the winrm service and open the firewall.

On One:

Again in a administrator PowerShell window, I ran:

Enable-WSManCredSSP -role client -delegatecomputer two.mydomain.com

Failure!  I got a big text message in red that said to run winrm quickconfig.

This is odd, since I did none of this to connect to the Server 2012 Hyper-V instance.

I then shift+right-clicked on Hyper-V Manager and ran it with my domain credentials and it ran! Ah ha!  No problem, just create a runas shortcut for Hyper-V Manager.

C:\Windows\System32\runas.exe /user:mydomain\myusername /savecreds "%windir%\System32\mmc.exe "%windir%\System32\virtmgmt.msc""

Again, no joy.  Launching my new short-cut from a command prompt showed the error:

740: The requested operation requires elevation.

The command needs ADUC elevation, with some Googling** I finally found a solution, first launch a cmd prompt and then the command.  This allows you to receive the ADUC prompt and accept it.

C:\WINDOWS\system32\runas.exe /savecred /user:mydomain\myusername "cmd /c Start /B %windir%\System32\mmc.exe "%windir%\System32\virtmgmt.msc""

The path to the Hyper-V Manager icon is here:

%ProgramFiles%\Hyper-V\SnapInAbout.dll
...
*I don’t recall my logic in installing Windows 10 here instead of Server 2012…it may have just been laziness, an upgrade to Win10 from the previous Windows 8.1 OS that was installed.

 

**http://serverfault.com/questions/374342/run-active-directory-admin-center-as-another-user

Posted in Hyper-V, Uncategorized, Virtualization, Windows 10, Windows 2012 | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Restoring the Quick Launch Menu (and Windows Explorer) for Windows 7 and 10

Posted by essjae on January 10, 2016

(this is an updated repost of an article I have on my deprecated http://www.essjae.com website)

One thing I really had grown accustomed to is the Quick Launch menu and easily opening multiple Windows Explorer windows across my 2 and 3 monitor setups and seeing the Drives view.

Both of these have been noticeably missing since Win 7.

Step 1: Get back the Quick Launch menu

  • Right-click the Taskbar, select Toolbars–>New Toolbar.
  • In Folder text box copy and paste the following:     %userprofile%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Quick Launch
  • Right-click the Taskbar, uncheck Lock the Taskbar, and right-click on the new Quick Launch toolbar. Uncheck Show Text and Show Title, click View–>Small Icons
  • Drag the toolbar divider all the way to the left of the taskbar to position it next to the Windows Orb, adjust the spacing on the taskbar as necessary
  • End result: quicklaunchicons  (minus the Explorer icon)
  • Step 2:
  • Add Windows Explorer in Win 7
    •  Click the Orb, then All Programs–>Accessories
    • Right-click to select and drag Windows Explorer () to the Quick Launch toolbar, then release
    • Select Copy Here from the pop-up menu
    • Right-click the Windows Explorer icon (), then click Properties
  • In Windows 10
    •  select and copy %SystemRoot%\
    • Click the Win icon or press the Win key and then paste %SystemRoot%\
    • Press Enter
    • Find explorer.exe, right-click and drag it to the Quick Launch bar
    • Right-click the Windows Explorer icon (), then click Properties
  • Add the following to the end of the command in Target:     /e,
  • The command should look like this:  %SystemRoot%\explorer.exe /e,

we-props

  • Click OK
  • Now, when you click on the Windows Explorer icon you’ll see this:
    • display

Posted in Win7, Windows, Windows 10 | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Disabling Aero Shake via Group Policy

Posted by essjae on December 1, 2015

If you’re running Pro or higher, you can use Group Policy to disable Aero Shake instead of a Registry edit.

Press the Windows key and enter “gpedit.msc” to launch the Local Group Policy Editor

Navigate to “User Configuration–>Administrative Templates–>Desktop”

Double-click “Turn off Aero Shake window minimizing mouse gesture” and select “Enabled” to disable it.

aeroshake

Posted in Windows, Windows 10 | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Enabling or Disabling Aero Shake on Windows 10

Posted by essjae on November 30, 2015

Has this happened to you?  You’re moving around one window, trying to position it just right and all your other windows just minimize? You’re a victim  of the Aero Shake minimize.

This seems to get me more often than I’d like.  There’s a simple way to disable it via the Registry.

Keep in mind that messing with Registry can cause bad things to happen to your system.  Make a backup before you mess around.  If you’re uncomfortable, maybe you don’t change this.

The Registry key you need is here:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Explorer

NoWindowMinimizingShortcuts DWORD

Set to 0 = Enable
Set to 1 = Disable

 

This should work on Home and Pro versions.

Posted in Windows, Windows 10 | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Windows 10 Hyper-V: Installing Linux in Gen2 VMs

Posted by essjae on May 15, 2015

Important Notes:

Firmware:

Disable Secure Boot

settings-firmware

SCSI Controller:

Add a DVD drive for your ISO file

settings-scsi

Posted in Hyper-V, Virtualization, Windows 10 | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Windows 10 Hyper-V: Setting up Networking Shared and Bridged Options

Posted by essjae on May 14, 2015

Update:  It’s now a lot easier to create networks (using PowerShell) in Windows 10 Hyper-V:  https://smudj.wordpress.com/2016/03/10/adding-nat-to-hyper-v-in-windows-10-and-higher/

Update: Build 10586.3–Loopback adapter was missing, added back, and checked Hyper-V Extensible Virtual Switch.  This seems to happen with each build update.  A reboot may also be required.

This procedure shows you how to set up bridged and shared (NAT) networking with a single physical network card.

Standard Bridged Networking

  1. Start the Hyper-V Manager and click Virtual Switch Manager
  2. Select External and click Create Virtual Switch
  3. Enter Bridged or similar to identify this network as being on your physical network
  4. Select the correct network adapter under External network, this should be an active network card, i.e. one that is connected to your network and your host is using.
    1. If you only have one network card, verify that Allow management operating system to share this network adapter.
    2. If you have multiple network cards, and want to use this card exclusively for VMs, uncheck Allow management operating system to share this network adapter.
  5. Click OK and the new virtual switch will be created.
  6. Verify that you don’t have any ongoing network tasks before clicking yes, as your network connection will likely be disrupted when the virtual switch is created.
  7. This will create a network adapter under Network Connections called vEthernet (name_used), in this case, vEthernet (Bridged)

Shared Networking

Manually add a loopback adapter

  1. Open a cmd prompt with Administrator privileges.
    1. Type cmd, right-click on the search result and click Run as administrator
  2. Type hdwwiz and press enter
  3. add-new-hardware-wizard
  4. Click Next to start the wizard.
  5. Select Install the hardware that I manually select from a list (Advanced), and click
  6. Highlight Network Adapters, and click Next.
  7. Select Microsoft from the Manufacturer column and Microsoft KM-TEST Loopback Adapter from the Model column and click Next.
  8. ms-loopback
    1. Click Finish to complete the wizard.
    2. Open Network Connections (CTRL+X and select Network Connections), locate the newly created loopback adapter, right-click it and click Rename, and rename it from Ethernet 2 or Ethernet 3 to Loopback.

Create the Shared Virtual Network Switch in Hyper-V

  1. Open the Hyper-V Manager and click Virtual Switch Manager
  2. Select External and click Create Virtual Switch
  3. Enter a descriptive name, like Shared or NAT. This will create a network adapter under Network Connections called vEthernet (name_used), in this case, vEthernet (Shared)
  4. Select the Loopback adapter under the External Network selection box, click OK, then click Yes, this operation will not disrupt your host networking.

Connect the Loopback Adapter and Virtual Switch to the Network

  1. Open Network Connections (CTRL+X and select Network Connections)
  2. Click Change adapter settings
  3. Right-click and select Properties on the vEthernet (Bridged) network adapter created under Standard Bridged Networking.
  4. Click the Sharing
  5. Click Allow other network users to connect through this computer’s Internet connection.
  6. vEthernet(bridged)
  7. Select the Shared network connection, it should be listed as vEthernet (Shared), or whatever name was used in place of Bridged.
  8. Click Ok.

Note:  The Hyper-V networking is very fragile here, and you may need to reboot if you get errors when trying to connect and share the connections.

Here’s the completed Network Connections Window, note the Bridged and Shared Hyper-V adapters. Apologies for the pixelation, the Hyper-V Manager is not 4K screen friendly.

virtual_switches

Here’s two VMs using the Shared networking, note, the 192.168.137.x network, the default used by ICS.  Also shown is a third VM using the host network and the host’s IP.

IPconfigs-4

Posted in Computers, Hyper-V, Windows 10 | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »